Category Archives: Explore Pilipinas

There is so much natural beauty to see in over 7,000 of our islands.

Mount Pinatubo: Trekking up an Active Volcano

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I found myself well beyond my shire and on an adventure I wasn’t quite fit for. For a lethargic couch potato with a bad knee, the quest to the crater lake of Mount Pinatubo was daunting.

The confidence boost came from the knowledge that elder folk and kids would be joining the trek. I could keep up with them naman siguro… right? Haha!

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Bottom line is, I made it! So you can, too. In fact, you don’t feel the incline until the final stretch to the crater. And since you’ll be so focused on finding a trustworthy spot to place your next step, time dashes by.

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The trip begins early from the jump-off point with a bumpy hour on a 4×4 to the foot of the volcano. The trek to the crater takes around 2 hours. The most challenging section of the trip for me would be the staircase of, maybe, 200 steps to get to the lake.

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But oh, what a magnificent sight – still waters floating within the crater of a sleeping volcano! it’s the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow; the treasure under the spot marked “X”; the pièce de résistance!

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The sights along the trail are also awe-inspiring, should you take the time to look up and around. Mountains of ash with remnants of mini landslides. Boulders and rocks and stones and pebbles. Cold streams – wide and tiny. Sulfur stains. Local tribespeople with smiling faces and genuine greetings… To think, this is the same volcano that gave us the second largest eruption in the 20th century.

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After 600 years of dormancy, Mount Pinatubo erupted in June 1991. Clouds of gas and hot ash burst into the air and flowing lava gushed out of the volcano. Hundreds of lives were taken and the world was stunned as the the global temperature dropped and the color gray rained throughout the Philippines and as far as Singapore. A river of volcanic mud ran through Central Luzon taking lives, livelihood, and homes while changing the landscape forever. Mount Pinatubo would erupt again throughout 1991 and 1992.

1991 Mount Pinatubo Eruption
The stillness of the crater lake, the calm sound of gentle streams, the permanent placement of boulders and smoothed stones, the delicate hills of dust… The beauty you find along the Pinatubo trail is a testament to the catastrophic Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991.

1991 Mount Pinatubo Eruption
While trekking, naturally, you’ll be looking down and ahead most of the way. But do not forget to peel your eyes from the path and appreciate the glory of nature – sheer and brutal beauty. Step into the shot and take lots of photos and videos. Enjoy the scenery. Horror gifted us with this serenity.

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If you’re looking to go on your own Mount Pinatubo adventure, there are lots of tour providers from Manila. We used Allan Bognot, who also owns a pension house at the jump-off point.

Just some tips:

  • Doing the trek early in the morning was great! It got quite chilly (this was end-December).
  • Use sunscreen. Your trek back which will be around noon to 2pm and you’ll feel the sun much more then. I heard it’s extra hot on any other time of year!
  • Eat a big breakfast and bring snacks (my tummy was grumbling on the trek back).
  • Use comfortable shoes that you don’t mind getting water and sand in. Hiking shoes would be best.
  • Check this link out for tips and an alternative tour package.
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Apo Island Coastal Cleanup: My Do Good Get Dirty Experience

The Do Good Get Dirty trip turned out to be way more than I expected and I am sincerely grateful to Green Cross and Rajah Travel for taking us on such a grand adventure! Check out snippets of our exploits here and our yummy Dumaguete food trip here. You can also watch and share in our experience here. :)

 I found myself crashing a fiesta, jumping off a cliff, and swimming with sea turtles!

I joined the Do Good Get Dirty challenge to make a difference but tables turned and the experience changed me instead! 🙂

I now know a bit more about my country.
Special thanks to Jaret of Rajah Travel for the photo!

It’s a shame I haven’t gone to more places around the Philippines. There are so many interesting pockets to visit and learn about! Negros Oriental is one of those little sachets with a unique history and inspiring stories packed inside. Special shout out to our tour guides Kuya Bong in Dumaguete, Valencia, and Apo Island and Kuya Luis in Siquijor. These guys have an answer for everything! And I really appreciated sharing the experience with people so passionate, knowledgeable, and proud of their home. If you’re receptive, you may just develop a love for the place, too.

I actually enjoyed eating buko-y stuff!
Dumaguete Express from the famous Lab-as restaurant
Dumaguete Express from the famous Lab-as restaurant

Mababaw, maybe, but there are things I’m certain about and one of those things is my dislike for the taste of coconut and coconut milk. I would rather eat crickets than gata! (I know I’m weird.) But I told myself to step out of my comfort zone during this trip. And, apparently, that meant eating Dumaguete Express (made with coconut milk) and I even ate buko pandan dessert! The awesome food trip would not have been complete without Dumaguete Express. I loved it! And it has opened me up to trying food I normally wouldn’t.

We all jumped.

15BA 30-foot drop into a crystal clear sea… Lui, Tim, and I were all afraid of the jump for different reasons. Tim was afraid of the fall. I was afraid of the landing. And Lui was afraid of the water. Still, each of us made the leap! It was thrilling and empowering. I am so proud of Team Dumaguete!

I was reminded of how we are all connected.
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Thank you, Vince of Green Cross, for the great photos!

The highlight of the trip was Apo Island – a marine sanctuary where sea turtles like to chill out. Every month, the community gets together to clean their beach. This is a very tight-knit community, quite literally all family, of about 1,000 residents. It was moving to meet them and be a part of their monthly routine.

The target, really, is plastic. They explained that the sea turtle or pawikan feeds on seagrass and algae. Sadly, it is in these seagrass beds that many pieces of plastic get tangled. Eating the plastic can poison the sea turtles and kill them.

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Thank you, Vince of Green Cross, for the great photos!

As a group, we started cleaning up the beach from one end to the other. I honestly expected little trash here and there considering they clean up every month. Unfortunately, I was wrong. There were way too many little and big bits of plastic, most entwined in the seaweed washed up on shore. What’s alarming is that most of the trash isn’t even from the Apo community, nor is it from tourists that snorkel or dive. The garbage comes from the sea (which, in turn, came from the rest of us). And the recent storms have increased the volume and frequency of this dumping of waste on Apo Island.

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Thank you, Vince of Green Cross, for the great photos!

One of the most jarring moments happened when I was already snorkeling with the graceful pawikan. I was swimming after one and noticed a string of plastic stuck around its tail (You know the kind they use to secure boxes?). We aren’t allowed to touch the marine life so I pointed it out to our guide. Thankfully, he was able to pull the string free from the poor pawikan.

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Thank you, Vince of Green Cross, for the great photos!

I’m certain this isn’t unique to Apo Island. I wonder how many of my wrappers have found a way, somehow, onto a pretty beach (or worse). I rarely think about where my waste goes after I throw it into a bin. But we never know, right?

Even unconsciously, the little things we do can make an impact on others and the environment.

I got to thinking about the mass production of all plastic packages and bottles and ropes and strings… And how we don’t really think about how much we consume and how much garbage is produced in the process.

There is so much natural beauty in the world. How long will it take for us to wreck it all?

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My trip to Dumaguete and Siquijor was one for the books. It was fun and exciting and insightful and inspiring and magnificent! (I even witnessed the most beautiful sunset.) And while there were challenges here and there, I realize the bigger challenge is sustaining the “Do Good” part of the campaign wayyyyy after the experience.

While I have no control over what everyone else does, I am responsible for my own choices. And there are a whole lot of things I can do to minimize my impact on the environment.

Using a reusable water bottle instead of buying disposable bottled water, using reusable bags for groceries, being more mindful of what goods to buy and their packaging, maybe buying in bulk instead of tiny sachets, ensure my waste is disposed of properly, eating less or no meat, buying locally produced goods, use less energy, unplug, don’t waste paper, etc.

Maybe sometime soon, I’ll find a way to make a bigger and more lasting impact. But, despite the cheesiness, I do believe that it starts with me. I have to live it.

Cambugahay Falls Thanks to Jaret of Rajah Travel for the photo.
Cambugahay Falls, Siquijor
Thanks to Jaret of Rajah Travel for the photo.
Thanks again, Green Cross Alcohol and Rajah Travel, for such a fun and inspiring experience! If you're in the mood for some yummy food, check out my post  on Dumaguete's Delights!
Also, check out our webisode!

A Quick Rundown of Dumaguete’s Delights

Big thank you to Green Cross (Total Defense) and Rajah Travel for the unforgettable trip! Check out my next blog post on the entire "Do Good Get Dirty" experience. :)

I found my taste buds rejoicing! One of the things to love about the Philippines is definitely food.

It was my first time in Dumaguete City, Oriental Negros, and we were greeted with a feast fit for a sweet tooth!

This was the appetizer –  hot chocolate with the native delicacy called budbud (just like sum an) and a sweet ripe mango.

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These are two varieties of the local delicacy called budbud. The one above is made from sticky rice and the one below, called budbud kabog, is made with bird seed. Though it may look grainier than the other, the budbud kabog had a smoother and softer consistency.

There are two varieties. One is typically what we Filipinos are used to, made from sticky rice. The other is a bit more unconventional called budbud kabog and is made out of millet (which is actually sold as bird seed!).

Believe it or not, I preferred the budbud kabog and I’m now wondering when I’ll taste its loveliness with poured tsokolate again… (Leads, anyone?)

Silvanas is a frozen cookie version of the Sans Rival cake. It's made with buttercream sandwiched by merengue-cashew wafers, coated in cookie crumbs.
Silvanas is a frozen cookie version of the Sans Rival cake. It’s made with buttercream sandwiched by merengue-cashew wafers, coated in cookie crumbs.

After our lunch meal, out came the plates of silvanas and SANS RIVAL, the delicious desserts Dumaguete is known for. (SANS RIVAL is in all caps because it was HUGE. SOLID. INTENSE. And must be said and heard with a deep, monstrous voice.)

This is the famous Sans Rival from Sans Rival Bistro! Sans Rival is a Filipino dessert made of layers of merengue and buttercream and littered with cashews. YUM.
This is the famous Sans Rival from Sans Rival Bistro! Sans Rival is a Filipino dessert made of layers of merengue and buttercream and littered with cashews. YUM.

We were all in awe of the SANS RIVAL. And we all looked up to the heavens with a resounding. “Mmmmm,” after taking a bite. Duh-freaking-licious!

This is a chocolate version of the silvana. I didn't care much for it but it's still worth a try! Let me know what you think. :)
This is a chocolate version of the silvana. I didn’t care much for it but it’s still worth a try! Let me know what you think. 🙂

I suppose Sans Rival and Silvanas taste pretty much the same anywhere. I guess what gave these an edge was the consistency. The Silvanas had a heavenly crunch with every bite and the Sans Rival was so easy to slice. (My mouth is watering while writing this… and I just had a bar of chocolate!!!)

Dumaguete goes beyond dessert, of course. For a legit-happy-tummy meal, look no further than Lab-as (meaning Fresh)! We got to try the Dumaguete Express, which I found surprisingly yummy. Surprising because I don’t usually like food with coconut milk or gata. This one, though, blew me away. And because of this dish, I’m now more open to try other coconut milk-based food.

Dumaguete Express from the famous Lab-as restaurant
Dumaguete Express from the famous Lab-as restaurant – a mixture of fresh seafood and crispy chopped pork cooked in coconut milk with malunggay leaves and chili.

By the way, I heard Lab-as’s sister bar and resto serves the best pizza in town! Something to try out when I return to Dumaguete.

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Fish Pizza on Apo Island

Speaking of pizza, I must give a shout out to the fish pizza in Apo Island! Apo Island is a marine sanctuary with sweet sea turtles to swim with. Naturally, you’ll get hungry after all the snorkeling. ORDER THE FISH PIZZA!

For a quick and cheap meal, Scooby’s is the spot to run to! It’s Dumaguete’s very own local fast food joint. Their cheeseburger was pretty good! It reminded me of an improved Tropical Hut slash Mushroom Burger cheeseburger.

Cheeseburger and Siopao from Scooby's
Cheeseburger and Siopao from Scooby’s

But the pleasant surprise was their Asado Siopao. OH MY GOODNESS. I had this favorite Asado Siopao in Manila (from Chocful of Nuts in Greenhills). It was my absolute favorite. It made me so happy! But that’s all in past tense now. Scooby’s siopao superseded my expectations and overtook my past siopao experiences! It had shredded pork asado instead of big chunks, thick and tasty sauce, bits of pepper, and just the right amount of fat – strategically located. When am I going to taste this again?!? Ugh. It’s so sad that I’m so far away from my new favorite siopao. 😦

There are a whole lot more places to try in Dumaguete! This quick rundown of my food experience cannot do justice to the foodie city. If you have any tips of restaurants and delicacies to try, go ahead and leave a comment so I can try ’em out when I head back to hoard Scooby’s siopao. Haha! 🙂

Okie dokes! I'll leave you with this photo me and my fellow travelers in front of a giant budbud during the Buglasan Festival in Dumaguete. LOL. :D
I’ll leave you with this photo me and my fellow travelers in front of a giant budbud during the Buglasan Festival in Dumaguete. LOL. 😀

Travel with me for free, maybe?

My goal this year was to jumpstart my career working for causes and for positive change in the world.

I believe I’ve made strides by doing a whole bunch of everything in GET. It’s a great start. And although it’s extremely taxing, I am still crazy committed to pursue a career in development.

But I will admit, I miss traveling.

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Writing this post reminded me of my 2010 trip to Bohol. Why? Read on and find out! (Photo by Andrew Romualdez)

My mom, sister, and ninong (godfather) just flew to Dubai and I’m so inggit (envious)! So what do I do? I Google. (Research helps me deal with my emotions. Thank you, interwebs! HAHA!)

Doing a bunch of research on how to travel for free, I came across the idea of “Volunteer Travel”. Exciting!

There are actual travel tours that incorporate volunteerism in the package! Check out Contiki or Volunteer Travels for cheap travel and immersion: take care of animals in a nature reserve, help educate orphans, or join environmental projects – in South America, Europe, or somewhere closer to home!

Spending time immersed in a foreign culture does wonders to your perspective. Imagine actually getting your hands dirty and becoming part of a solution instead of just complaining about a problem? I’m certain that would be an enlightening and an empowering experience. I would lurrrrve to be a part of that!

Green Cross Total Defense's Do Good Get Dirty Campaign
Green Cross Total Defense’s Do Good Get Dirty Campaign (Click on the image to link to the website.)

Since I’m on a TIGHT budget, I found the perrrrrfect option. Plus you might be able to come, too, because it’s for free. 🙂

I came across the Do Good Get Dirty campaign of Green Cross. And just in time, too! (I think you can only submit entries until October 3) You just have to submit a short video for a chance to travel for free as a volunteer. How awesome is that?

I’ll have to choose a destination, though. You can pick from 3. I’m still deciding between Siquijor and Sarangani (since I’ve already been to Puerto Prinsesa)… What do you think?


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Here’s me (early in the morning) with an equally sleepy tarsier! (Photo by Andrew Romualdez)

Mount Matutum, Sarangani: Tarsier Sanctuary

Yes! There are tarsiers outside of Bohol. And Endangered Species International is working with the local tribe to protect the tarsiers and their habitat.

Siquijor: APO Island Marine Sanctuary

First off, it’s in Siquijor – a place known for their aswang (a mythical monster in the Philippines). The scare-factor alone entices me! And I’m in need of a tan… So. I’m leaning towards this one. HEEHEE.


In truth, either one would be awesome. Environmental Conservation is a cause close to my heart and I should do more to support it. It’s not like mother nature has a voice we can literally understand; it’s not as if wildlife can represent itself and voice out concerns to government or the U.N.. And, being Filipino, it’s one of the few remaining things that make me proud of my country – the Philippines’ natural beauty.

If you’re interested in joining, let me know! We can support each other by voting and liking each others’ videos and things like that. It would be cool to go on such a meaningful trip with strangers that can turn out to be wonderful friends. 🙂

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Me pretending to be a tarsier. :p (Photo by Andrew Romualdez)

Ilocos Trippin’ 2012

Sooo… I don’t really have much mind or much time to write some flamboyant entertaining post on my Ilocos Adventure. But I did work on this video so I hope you enjoy! Who knows, I might go back to this post… Pick it up, edit, swirl and twirl it into a magnificent piece on how Ilocos is the cradle of Northern Luzon’s culture and history.

But for now, why not just experience it for yourself? All the information you need is right here.

Good job, Philippines!

Ilocos Trippin’ Basics

I went from Manila to Vigan. Stayed overnight. Traveled to Laoag, then Pagudpud. I left Manila late Friday night and got back Monday morning.

I suggest you stay an extra day in Pagudpud to enjoy the beach but go when it’s a bit warmer. Nowadays, with the weather going haywire thanks to our wasteful ways, I’m not sure when that’ll be. This year, early March is pretty HOT.

I suggest you follow the same route, but ALSO visit Bangui Windmills and Cape Bojeador Light House on the way to Pagudpud from Laoag. I wasn’t traveling with a group and didn’t want to splurge on a van from Vigan to Pagudpud so I took a bus and couldn’t make pitstops.

Okie dokes! Here’s the skeletal information with my side comments.

Manila to Vigan

How To Get There

Bus Companies

  • I rode a Partas Deluxe Bus from the Cubao station for Php720/person. Pretty spacious and comfortable.
  • 8-9 hours on the road
  • No toilet
  • Bring a jacket! It’s fuh-reezing! Though that’s just me. I don’t fare well in the cold. Hehe!
  • Best call the bus companies for their daily bus schedule and rates. Those fluctuate. 😉

Partas (Cubao) – (+63.2) 727.8278 / 725 1740

Partas (Pasay) – (+63.2) 851.4025 / 410 1307

Florida (Cubao) – (+63.2) 781 5894

Florida (Pasay) – (+63.2) 912 5354

Maria De Leon (Sampaloc, Manila) – (+63.2) 731-4907

Farinas (Sampaloc, Manila) – (+63.2) 731.4507

Where To Stay

  • I stayed in Grandpa’s Inn and I am completely satisfied! They have a great restaurant, a coffee shop, and the place is so quaint and antique-y! I will definitely stay there again.
  • I got the fan room with 2 twin beds and a restroom for just Php980/night!
  • Vigan is very small so anywhere you stay will be close to everything else. No need to stress about that.
  • Here are some places I recommend. Best to call or SMS in advance for questions and reservations.
  • Grandpa’s Inn would be more than happy to help you get a van to tour Laoag, the lighthouse, windmills, and take you to Pagudpud. Just call them up and ask for the rates and schedule! I’m pretty sure the other hotels would be able to do that as well.

Grandpa’s Inn – (+63.917) 580.2118 – Website

Villa Angela Heritage House – (+63.2) 425.6473 / (+63.919) 315.6122 / (+63.927) 894.0610 – Website

Hotel Salcedo de Vigan – (+63.917) 856.4588 / (+63.917) 990.6675 – Website

Vigan Plaza Hotel –  (+63.2) 246.1501 / (+63.77) 722.1527 / 632.0317 – Website

How To Get Around

  • A tricycle will take you anywhere around the city. Php30 should get you to your hotel from the bus station. And that’s for 2 people already!
  • WALK. It’s a tiny city and you see more by walking. Grab a free map from your hotel and explore
  • KALESA or horse-drawn carriage. The kalesa drivers know all the tourist spots (museums, churches, bell tower, pot-making, gardens, zoo, etc.) so just hop on one from off the street and ask him where he can take you! It’s Php150/hour (Rates may change so ask the front desk of your hotel.). Prepare to pay around Php500. There are a lot of places to see! Reserve the whole afternoon for exploring!
  • Feel free to give an extra tip if you can spare the cash. 😉

Where To Go

  • Don’t forget to ask for a map at the front desk of your hotel. All the sites should be on there as well and you can plot out your own route based on where you’re coming from and where you want to end up. 🙂
  • The places are free but they ask for donations. I’d give Php20 per museum just to help them maintain it. 😉
  • Below are the sites you can walk to, fosho’

Calle Crisologo – Cobblestone streets, sound of hooves clonkity clonking, ancestral homes… It’s a beautiful walk that’ll take you back to the Spanish era. Here you’ll find loads of shops where you can buy local woven products like blankets, robes, bags, etc. Furniture, too!

Sy-Quia Mansion – The Vigan residence of 6th president of the Philippines – Elpidio Quirino. If it’s open, there should be a tour guide to explain the history of the house, its furnishings, and the family.

Crisologo Museum – Residence of the Crisologo family turned into a museum

  • You can walk to the places below or take a kalesa already. If you’re up for it, I suggest you walk then hail a kalesa after to save on moolah. 🙂

Vigan Cathedral/St. Paul Metropolitan Cathedral

Archbishop’s Residence

Father Jose Burgos’ Residence

Plaza Burgos & Plaza Salcedo

  • It’s best to take a kalesa ride to these next places! It’s a great experience and these sites are far from the city and kalesas are more comfortable and more environment-friendly than tricycles! The horses are
  • The kalesa drivers know where to go and they know information about certain places, too. Feel free to be friendly and ask them questions. They may have some interesting stories to tell!

Bantay’s Bell Tower and St. Augustine Church – Get ready for some cardio up some stairs!

Pagburnayan – You can try to make a clay pot after you watch them. They make it look too easy! You can’t take the pot home with you, though. It is sun dried and takes about a week.

Hidden Garden – I could’ve skipped this, quite honestly.

Sunflower Farm – I’m sad I didn’t get to see the fields of sunflowers! Ask your kalesa driver if the sunflowers are in bloom.

Baluarte Mini Zoo – Pretty interesting considering it’s privately owned by Philippine politician Chavit Singson. There are tigers, ostriches, dears, small horses… Website!

What To Eat

Vigan Longganisa – A longganisa is a small but chubby salty sausage filled with goodness! Vigan is known for their version of the longganisa. Best to eat this for breakfast with garlic rice (called sinangag) and egg. Don’t forget to put a little vinegar (called suka; pinakurat is the type of strong suka they may have) for an extra kick! (I ate this as my free breakfast meal in Grandpa’s Inn!)

Ilocos Empanada – Ilocos has their own brand of empanadas. It’s deep fried and crunchy with egg, meats (preferably longganisa), and a bit of veggies inside. Again, don’t forget the suka! (Irene’s Empanada is really good. They have a nook in Calle Crisologo and another near Sy-Quia Mansion)

Bagnet – Ooh yeah! A delicious slab of fried pork both crunchy and tender! I love  this!!! With rice, of course. And best with a hint of this mixture – bagoong (fish sauce) and calamansi (our tad sweeter mini version of a lemon). You can eat this with the pinakbet as well, since pinakbet is made with bagoong. MM-MM-MMMMMM!!!

Pinakbet – Delish mix of veggies!!! Just try it! Ok. Now I’m hungry.

Vigan to Laoag

How To Get There

  • The front desk of your hotel can check everything for you whether you want to take the bus and need the schedule or get a van ready for you to tour all the way to Laoag and Pagudpud. I suggest you take the van. It’s more expensive but you can split the cost between a group.
  • Should you take the bus, you’ll need to hire a tricycle to tour Laoag.

Where To Eat

Saramsam

La Preciosa

Where To Go

  • To get around, you’ll need to hire a tricycle. They may try to charge you outrageous fees so be wary! We paid Php200 to get from the bus station to a restaurant for lunch and the following sites, then back to the bus station.

Sinking Bell Tower

St. William The Hermit Cathedral

Ilocos Norte Capitol

Tobacco Monopoly Abolition Monument – Right next to the capitol and near the Sinking Bell Tower

Museo Ilocos Norte

  • If only I had time to spare, I would’ve gone to the sites below. These are a bit farther so you’ll have to pay your tricycle driver more. I’ve searched online and Php500 should do it. Go on and try out your bargaining skills! But, again, if you took a van, this wouldn’t be a problem at all. 😉

Paoay Church – A UNESCO World Heritage Site

Malacanang of the North, Paoay

Bacarra Bell Tower

La Paz Sand Dunes

Laoag to Pagudpud

How To Get  There

  • Again, I must stress the ease and stress-less-ness (I know that isn’t a word) of hiring a van from Vigan. Because from Laoag I took a non-aircon bus to Pagudpud. *bow*
  • This is the time you can pass through Burgos to visit the Cape Bojeador Light House then the Bangui Windmills – both of which I missed out on. Instead, I experienced sweating onto my seat with my bag on my lap and getting squished to the window with a bunch of random people. Buttttt, you only pay Php60/person! So feel free to choose your adventure. :p
  • Once you reach Pagudpud, pass by the Florida “station”. There are quotation marks ‘coz it’s more like a simple restaurant area but you’ll see the buses outside. Just ask around. PURCHASE YOUR TICKET HOME ALREADY! Just so you’re sure you have a seat. 😉

How To Get Around

  • I’ll give you one guess.
  • Make sure to get the mobile number of your tricycle driver in case you need a ride!

Where To Stay

  • There were a few new resorts sprouting up so go and check online to find more resorts to stay in!
  • Don’t forget to ask the resort if they have free transfers from the bus area to the resort and back when it’s time to say bye-bye.

Villa Del MarWebsite

Hannah’s Website

Terra Rika Website

Where To Go

  • Uhhh… THE BEACH. There are island tours you can try, too. And feel free to take a tricycle to the main town or “bay an” to have some empanada and longganisa. YUM.

That’s about it. BAM!!!