Tag Archives: Food

My Beef with Beef

I stopped eating beef in November 2014. So far, I don’t miss it… that much. I got through the holidays and said, “No thank you,” to a number of steaks and roast beefs. So any other season should be a breeze without the number one source of protein. Hehe! Beef ArticleI decided to stop eating cows when I read this article that had an expert state, “The biggest intervention people could make towards reducing their carbon footprints would not be to abandon cars, but to eat significantly less red meat.” (For details on WHY, read the article.) Since I want to be kinder to the world humanity has been abusing from time immemorial, I figured it’s the least I can do as a member of the species. Going vegetarian (possibly even vegan) was always an option locked up in my mind. Assuming I wasn’t ready to give up meat yet, I made a conscious effort not to read books or watch videos that’ll make me feel terrible for eating meat. Ignorance is bliss, right? Also, I didn’t want to stop eating a specific type of meat versus another. I felt that would be discriminatory… But then the article about beef gave me a reason to target cows and the cattle industry before any other animal. It seemed the perfect way to start that road to a more sustainable and less cruel diet. This year, I’ve decided to limit my meat intake to one meal a day. It has been a month and a half and I’m getting along quite fine. I’m not certain what type of impact I’m making on the environment. But to get a better idea, check this link out! It shows the impact of going vegetarian one day every week. The numbers are pretty impressive – saving 2,400 gallons of water and 7 pounds of grain per pound of beef! The fact that I’m just one person may make the impact negligible. But, I figure, it’s just like voting. Choosing to purchase beef is giving my vote to the cattle industry and the impact it has on the environment. They can win votes by a landslide, but that shouldn’t stop me from passing my honest vote against them. If they keep on keeping on, it won’t be thanks to my hard-earned cash! :p That’s how it is, I suppose. Purchasing power really is “power” in the sense that you have more votes to give to more businesses and industries. Your purchase is a contribution to the success of a business. It took me a while to realize that and accept it. Even consumption comes with a responsibility to society and the world as a whole. Hassle noh? Ang daming kailangan isipin. Hahaha! But that’s the way the cookie crumbles. (Apologies if any bliss was shattered with the ignorance bubble. But you can always shrug it off as you dream of your next juicy burger. Haha.) I hope to learn more about my purchases. It should extend to more than just food (although food really is a huge chunk of the budget) and more than just sustainability. At the end of the day, I just want to be a responsible consumer and a conscientious humanoid. 🙂

Apo Island Coastal Cleanup: My Do Good Get Dirty Experience

The Do Good Get Dirty trip turned out to be way more than I expected and I am sincerely grateful to Green Cross and Rajah Travel for taking us on such a grand adventure! Check out snippets of our exploits here and our yummy Dumaguete food trip here. You can also watch and share in our experience here. :)

 I found myself crashing a fiesta, jumping off a cliff, and swimming with sea turtles!

I joined the Do Good Get Dirty challenge to make a difference but tables turned and the experience changed me instead! 🙂

I now know a bit more about my country.
Special thanks to Jaret of Rajah Travel for the photo!

It’s a shame I haven’t gone to more places around the Philippines. There are so many interesting pockets to visit and learn about! Negros Oriental is one of those little sachets with a unique history and inspiring stories packed inside. Special shout out to our tour guides Kuya Bong in Dumaguete, Valencia, and Apo Island and Kuya Luis in Siquijor. These guys have an answer for everything! And I really appreciated sharing the experience with people so passionate, knowledgeable, and proud of their home. If you’re receptive, you may just develop a love for the place, too.

I actually enjoyed eating buko-y stuff!
Dumaguete Express from the famous Lab-as restaurant
Dumaguete Express from the famous Lab-as restaurant

Mababaw, maybe, but there are things I’m certain about and one of those things is my dislike for the taste of coconut and coconut milk. I would rather eat crickets than gata! (I know I’m weird.) But I told myself to step out of my comfort zone during this trip. And, apparently, that meant eating Dumaguete Express (made with coconut milk) and I even ate buko pandan dessert! The awesome food trip would not have been complete without Dumaguete Express. I loved it! And it has opened me up to trying food I normally wouldn’t.

We all jumped.

15BA 30-foot drop into a crystal clear sea… Lui, Tim, and I were all afraid of the jump for different reasons. Tim was afraid of the fall. I was afraid of the landing. And Lui was afraid of the water. Still, each of us made the leap! It was thrilling and empowering. I am so proud of Team Dumaguete!

I was reminded of how we are all connected.
8F9
Thank you, Vince of Green Cross, for the great photos!

The highlight of the trip was Apo Island – a marine sanctuary where sea turtles like to chill out. Every month, the community gets together to clean their beach. This is a very tight-knit community, quite literally all family, of about 1,000 residents. It was moving to meet them and be a part of their monthly routine.

The target, really, is plastic. They explained that the sea turtle or pawikan feeds on seagrass and algae. Sadly, it is in these seagrass beds that many pieces of plastic get tangled. Eating the plastic can poison the sea turtles and kill them.

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Thank you, Vince of Green Cross, for the great photos!

As a group, we started cleaning up the beach from one end to the other. I honestly expected little trash here and there considering they clean up every month. Unfortunately, I was wrong. There were way too many little and big bits of plastic, most entwined in the seaweed washed up on shore. What’s alarming is that most of the trash isn’t even from the Apo community, nor is it from tourists that snorkel or dive. The garbage comes from the sea (which, in turn, came from the rest of us). And the recent storms have increased the volume and frequency of this dumping of waste on Apo Island.

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Thank you, Vince of Green Cross, for the great photos!

One of the most jarring moments happened when I was already snorkeling with the graceful pawikan. I was swimming after one and noticed a string of plastic stuck around its tail (You know the kind they use to secure boxes?). We aren’t allowed to touch the marine life so I pointed it out to our guide. Thankfully, he was able to pull the string free from the poor pawikan.

P1160631
Thank you, Vince of Green Cross, for the great photos!

I’m certain this isn’t unique to Apo Island. I wonder how many of my wrappers have found a way, somehow, onto a pretty beach (or worse). I rarely think about where my waste goes after I throw it into a bin. But we never know, right?

Even unconsciously, the little things we do can make an impact on others and the environment.

I got to thinking about the mass production of all plastic packages and bottles and ropes and strings… And how we don’t really think about how much we consume and how much garbage is produced in the process.

There is so much natural beauty in the world. How long will it take for us to wreck it all?

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My trip to Dumaguete and Siquijor was one for the books. It was fun and exciting and insightful and inspiring and magnificent! (I even witnessed the most beautiful sunset.) And while there were challenges here and there, I realize the bigger challenge is sustaining the “Do Good” part of the campaign wayyyyy after the experience.

While I have no control over what everyone else does, I am responsible for my own choices. And there are a whole lot of things I can do to minimize my impact on the environment.

Using a reusable water bottle instead of buying disposable bottled water, using reusable bags for groceries, being more mindful of what goods to buy and their packaging, maybe buying in bulk instead of tiny sachets, ensure my waste is disposed of properly, eating less or no meat, buying locally produced goods, use less energy, unplug, don’t waste paper, etc.

Maybe sometime soon, I’ll find a way to make a bigger and more lasting impact. But, despite the cheesiness, I do believe that it starts with me. I have to live it.

Cambugahay Falls Thanks to Jaret of Rajah Travel for the photo.
Cambugahay Falls, Siquijor
Thanks to Jaret of Rajah Travel for the photo.
Thanks again, Green Cross Alcohol and Rajah Travel, for such a fun and inspiring experience! If you're in the mood for some yummy food, check out my post  on Dumaguete's Delights!
Also, check out our webisode!

A Quick Rundown of Dumaguete’s Delights

Big thank you to Green Cross (Total Defense) and Rajah Travel for the unforgettable trip! Check out my next blog post on the entire "Do Good Get Dirty" experience. :)

I found my taste buds rejoicing! One of the things to love about the Philippines is definitely food.

It was my first time in Dumaguete City, Oriental Negros, and we were greeted with a feast fit for a sweet tooth!

This was the appetizer –  hot chocolate with the native delicacy called budbud (just like sum an) and a sweet ripe mango.

budbud_Fotor
These are two varieties of the local delicacy called budbud. The one above is made from sticky rice and the one below, called budbud kabog, is made with bird seed. Though it may look grainier than the other, the budbud kabog had a smoother and softer consistency.

There are two varieties. One is typically what we Filipinos are used to, made from sticky rice. The other is a bit more unconventional called budbud kabog and is made out of millet (which is actually sold as bird seed!).

Believe it or not, I preferred the budbud kabog and I’m now wondering when I’ll taste its loveliness with poured tsokolate again… (Leads, anyone?)

Silvanas is a frozen cookie version of the Sans Rival cake. It's made with buttercream sandwiched by merengue-cashew wafers, coated in cookie crumbs.
Silvanas is a frozen cookie version of the Sans Rival cake. It’s made with buttercream sandwiched by merengue-cashew wafers, coated in cookie crumbs.

After our lunch meal, out came the plates of silvanas and SANS RIVAL, the delicious desserts Dumaguete is known for. (SANS RIVAL is in all caps because it was HUGE. SOLID. INTENSE. And must be said and heard with a deep, monstrous voice.)

This is the famous Sans Rival from Sans Rival Bistro! Sans Rival is a Filipino dessert made of layers of merengue and buttercream and littered with cashews. YUM.
This is the famous Sans Rival from Sans Rival Bistro! Sans Rival is a Filipino dessert made of layers of merengue and buttercream and littered with cashews. YUM.

We were all in awe of the SANS RIVAL. And we all looked up to the heavens with a resounding. “Mmmmm,” after taking a bite. Duh-freaking-licious!

This is a chocolate version of the silvana. I didn't care much for it but it's still worth a try! Let me know what you think. :)
This is a chocolate version of the silvana. I didn’t care much for it but it’s still worth a try! Let me know what you think. 🙂

I suppose Sans Rival and Silvanas taste pretty much the same anywhere. I guess what gave these an edge was the consistency. The Silvanas had a heavenly crunch with every bite and the Sans Rival was so easy to slice. (My mouth is watering while writing this… and I just had a bar of chocolate!!!)

Dumaguete goes beyond dessert, of course. For a legit-happy-tummy meal, look no further than Lab-as (meaning Fresh)! We got to try the Dumaguete Express, which I found surprisingly yummy. Surprising because I don’t usually like food with coconut milk or gata. This one, though, blew me away. And because of this dish, I’m now more open to try other coconut milk-based food.

Dumaguete Express from the famous Lab-as restaurant
Dumaguete Express from the famous Lab-as restaurant – a mixture of fresh seafood and crispy chopped pork cooked in coconut milk with malunggay leaves and chili.

By the way, I heard Lab-as’s sister bar and resto serves the best pizza in town! Something to try out when I return to Dumaguete.

Fish Pizza
Fish Pizza on Apo Island

Speaking of pizza, I must give a shout out to the fish pizza in Apo Island! Apo Island is a marine sanctuary with sweet sea turtles to swim with. Naturally, you’ll get hungry after all the snorkeling. ORDER THE FISH PIZZA!

For a quick and cheap meal, Scooby’s is the spot to run to! It’s Dumaguete’s very own local fast food joint. Their cheeseburger was pretty good! It reminded me of an improved Tropical Hut slash Mushroom Burger cheeseburger.

Cheeseburger and Siopao from Scooby's
Cheeseburger and Siopao from Scooby’s

But the pleasant surprise was their Asado Siopao. OH MY GOODNESS. I had this favorite Asado Siopao in Manila (from Chocful of Nuts in Greenhills). It was my absolute favorite. It made me so happy! But that’s all in past tense now. Scooby’s siopao superseded my expectations and overtook my past siopao experiences! It had shredded pork asado instead of big chunks, thick and tasty sauce, bits of pepper, and just the right amount of fat – strategically located. When am I going to taste this again?!? Ugh. It’s so sad that I’m so far away from my new favorite siopao. 😦

There are a whole lot more places to try in Dumaguete! This quick rundown of my food experience cannot do justice to the foodie city. If you have any tips of restaurants and delicacies to try, go ahead and leave a comment so I can try ’em out when I head back to hoard Scooby’s siopao. Haha! 🙂

Okie dokes! I'll leave you with this photo me and my fellow travelers in front of a giant budbud during the Buglasan Festival in Dumaguete. LOL. :D
I’ll leave you with this photo me and my fellow travelers in front of a giant budbud during the Buglasan Festival in Dumaguete. LOL. 😀

Dubai Travel Tips

FOOD

HummussssssThere are some wonderful food in Dubai! Do some research and make sure you have Indian, Lebanese, and Moroccan cuisine! I had the creamiest hummus I’ve ever tasted in my life in Zaroob. Also remembering Gazebo for Indian food and Al Hallab for Lebanese. I’ll scatter food photos around this post to tickle tastebuds!

TRANSPORTATION

Taxis. Taxi rates are reasonable. While there is a train system and some buses… gas is CHEAP. Seriously. You’ll probably post a photo of the gas prices on Instagram. Also, you wouldn’t want to walk in the heat of the desert. You might think you can because you like walking around. You walk around everywhere! But not in the desert. Trust me.

Al Hallab Goodness
Al Hallab Goodness

Rent a car. This might actually be cost effective if you’re a group. Plus, there’s no limit to where to go. Again, gas is cheap! But you will have to pay toll fees, which aren’t as cheap. Also, KNOW THE ROAD RULES. You won’t see many traffic cops but they have loads of sensors and cameras everywhere. And they will issue you a ticket, even without you knowing. Fines are expensive! So be sure you know the rules and strictly abide by them.

Trains & Buses. You can also take the Dubai Metro and their feeder buses. It isn’t the most extensive public transport system. But if you find your destination very close to a train station, then go for it! I took it a few times. The train and the stations are cool, but beyond the stations – walking in the desert heat is a major downer. (For more info, check out the Dubai Roads & Transport website or this unofficial site for the Dubai Metro)

OTHER TIPS

Gosht Hyderabadi Biryani at Gazebo
Gosht Hyderabadi Biryani at Gazebo

ONE: Before anything else, let me say that I LOVE GOOGLE MAPS. It isn’t perfect. But it is a huge, huge help whether you’re driving yourself, checking if the cab driver is taking you to the right place, or figuring out the public transport system. Google Maps is one of my best friends. Use Google Maps.

TWO: If you have a spare phone or if you don’t mind changing your sim card for the trip, you can purchase prepaid sim cards in Dubai. That way, you can stay mobile and online throughout your trip. (And you can use Google Maps the entire time.)

THREE: Keep your eyes peeled for booklets, maps, etc. with coupons! It can save you money on entrance fees and tour packages.

FOUR: SUN PROTECTION. Bring legit sunglasses – you can barely see without them. Wear sunscreen. You can bring an umbrella, too, if you’re extra afraid of the sun.

Moroccan
Moroccan

FIVE: Be mindful of what you wear. Don’t show too much skin. While they do tolerate foreigners wearing shorts and sleeveless tops (They even allow bikinis along the beach.), it’s best not to wear anything too short or revealing while walking around the City to avoid offending the locals. Also note that they’re a tad less liberal in Abu Dhabi.

 

(Did I make you hungry? Good. ‘Coz I’m starving after editing those photos!)

If you want to learn more about my experience in the Emirates, check out my post on sightseeing and my sort-of-review.  Also, if you have any more travel tips, thoughts, or whatever, feel free to use the comment box below!

 

My Top 5 Milk Tea Spots

Ang Mio Kio
You can check out a few other photos on my Instagram – MyJaninay

Milk Tea Madness around Metro Manila! Milk tea stands are sprouting up everywhere. It’s like the pearl shakes all over again; but now, these places have it all from pearl shakes to coffee-type stuff and, of course, ZE MILK TEA!

I understand it. Milk tea cravings haunt me. And I do enjoy the typical ones everyone tries like Cha Time, Happy Lemon, etc, etc.

But, for moi, my faves would have to be those in actual restaurants! Mm-mm-mm!!! So… I just want to share my favorite milk tea so far. You guys might want to try em out. Doesn’t hurt that in these restos, the food is good, too. You can enjoy lunch or dinner then cap it off with delish milk tea, as I do! WHEEEEE. I WANT.

In no particular order… Here goes!

5. Banana Leaf Asian Cafe’s Iced Milk Tea Hong Kong Style

SO GOOT. As for the food, my regulars are rotti canai with curry and the Hainanese Set Meal! That can feed 2 people already… Unless you feel like feasting which is perfectly fine in Banana Leaf because they have loads of tasty food. YEAY! There are a few branches all around the metro so it’s easy to find – Greenhills Promenade, Greenbelt, Rockwell, etc. Plus, they’re one of Philippine’s Best Restaurants in 2011!

http://www.bananaleaf.com.ph/

Thai Dara
For more photos, check out my Instagram – MyJaninay

4. Thai Dara’s Milk TeaI tried the quaint Thai Dara in Kapitolyo – you won’t miss it! They have another branch somewhere in QC as well. Their milk tea is gootenberg! And it’s great with spicy curry orders!

In case you didn’t know, milk relieves your tongue from the heat of spiciness. THAT is the cooling power of dairy!

3. Ang Mio Kio’s Milk Tea

Yummy Singaporean food in Ang Mio Kio – The Podium. And they have a range of delicious drinks like their milk tea and the milo dinosaur!

http://www.facebook.com/angmokiofood

2. Komrad’s Milk Tea

Komrad in Eastwood is a haven for people who enjoy spicy food. I LOVE IT THERE. Spiced up Chinese food for the win! But their hidden gem is definitely their milk tea. SO GOOD. I want to run over there right now and buy a glass!

1. Som’s Milk Tea

Som’s Milk Tea is sold in plastic bottles, like them typical PET bottles – very easy to hoard and stock in your refrigerator. And they’re REALLY good. I believe they have 2 locations – one is near Rockwell and the other is in the Maysilo circle across the Mandaluyong City Hall. I’d drive by there just to take a few bottles home.

ARGH. Now I’m craving for legit milk tea.

Heart And Seoul

Ja-Bin in Korea!

(Unedited Version of my Myx Mag Article)

I was in complete awe of Korea and in utter disbelief that I was sent there for work – to shoot a total of 9 shows and interview 2NE1’s Dara. It’s a remarkable place with breathtaking sights and, literally, breath-taking weather (It reached NEGATIVE 6 degrees one night!). As soon as VJ Robin and I stepped out of the plane, we were greeted by a waft of cold air that made me thankful for my scarf and beret… and Robin – regretful to have nothing but his t-shirt on (with jeans, socks, shoes, and, hopefully, underwear on as well).

As soon as we saw Myeong Dong, which is the area we would call home for 2 nights, our eyes widened and we simultaneously uttered, “WOW.” I was told that Myeong Dong is like the Makati City of Seoul. But, honestly, it looked nothing like Makati. People sashayed in their fashionable winter clothes. Beautiful pastel-colored shops lined the narrow alleys like sweet eye candy for us adventurous VJs. With such a beautiful backdrop, we got to work on the special Korean episodes to be shown on Myx.

Aside from feeding our appetite for adventure, we also made the most out of every meal of the day (which included merienda and a midnight snack). We sampled as many Korean delicacies as we could. We feasted on Ginseng Chicken, Bulgogi, Bulgogi Burgers, various street foods, and my newly discovered Korean favorite – Budae-chigae. We were thrilled to discover that cold weather makes your body work harder to keep you warm, thus burning the extra calories we consumed… Or at least that’s what we told ourselves to justify our excessive food tripping.

But the trip to Korea wasn’t all about feasting and frolicking. Robin and I were there on a mission. Without a crew or any staff from Myx to guide us, we were tasked to return home with a successful interview with K-Pop Superstar Sandara Park. Armed with our video cameras, list of questions, and bundle of nerves, we made our way to Dara’s TV Commercial shoot for Etude House (www.etudehouse.ph).  Even before we met her, we were impressed at how professional she was during the shoot. Watching monitors from a separate room, we saw how her eyes lit up once the director said, “Action!”

All intimidation melted once we met the sweet and soft-spoken Dara. Inspite of her flawless beauty, she has an air of humility that was exceptionally endearing. Not to mention, she still seems very attached to the Philippines and us Filipinos. She could not hide how much she missed the country and all her fans and friends back in the Philippines. Plus, she expressed herself tremendously well in Filipino, to the utter disbelief of our tongue-tied-when-speaking-Filipino-VJ Robin.

A photo from my Interview with Sandara Park in Korea!

Meeting 2NE1’s Dara was definitely the highlight of my trip. With the precious interview footage safely in tow, Robin and I headed home to Manila with a newfound love for Seoul Korea but also a greater appreciation for home. After all, if a K-Pop Superstar who is set to be an international sensation is proud to have lived in the Philippines, continues to speak in our language, and clearly misses the country and its people… Shouldn’t we also be proud to be Filipino? BAM!

Your Atypical Envoy To Quirky Hanoi

Hanoi is a some-kind-of-a quirky city – oddly different yet familiar.

Sidewalks lined with parked motorbikes.

Streets are ruled by motorcycles that weave through crowds and through each other, everyone moving along with an unwritten rule to preserve the flow. The rule? DON’T HESITATE. Yep. As soon as you decide to cross the street, keep walking forward. Don’t do the cha-cha-cha lest you confuse a driver and wind up wounded by a motorbike.

Lazy Sunday. My view while trying my first cup of Vietnamese iced coffee.

Sundays are lazy and calm… Until a group of local ladies find out about a sale in a shoe store at a street corner. Then a whole swarm of them will elbow their way to the pair and size they want and fight over voices for the price and a purchase. So many things are produced in Vietnam and so there are loads of things for you to buy… and for cheap! Clothes, shoes, and bags are only the tip of the Vietnamese Shopping Iceberg.

Pretty dresses for adorable babies line the walls of this boutique shop along Hang Gai Street (Silk Street).

Everything happens along the street, ON the street, and on the sidewalk. It made me wonder if they actually call them side-WALKs and not side-Whatever-You-Want-It-To-Bes. On a sidewalk, get yourself a mini plastic chair and table from a cafe and sip on their world-renowned coffee (iced on a hot day) as you watch pedicabs with foreign dudes taking pictures and videos. When the sun retires, join the locals as they pour out onto the street from the bar drinking not-so-strong beer while eating peanuts.

Locals drinking and eating peanuts on the street on a Friday night.

Most things are lowered. A lot of chairs and tables outside are low. Even dogs stay short. I saw chihuahuas and and other mixed breeds, all short. Also short, some of the vendors’ tempers. Like any other place, I suppose, there are some friendly locals and some not-so-accommodating ones. Most, I would say, are cordial. Save for the lady in some shoe store that swatted my shin with a slipper and a lady selling hats in the covered market. It’s as if her smile was worth a trillion bucks. HAHAHA.

So let’s talk about the vendors. A bit of a warning, they will charge you more because you’re a foreigner. A lady tried to sell me a munchkin for US$2! One hundred pesos, really? No way. :p Also, they may hound you. So it’s best not to entertain the vendors patrolling the streets because they might follow you down as Gin Blossoms said he would!

Read up on the local legends, particularly the legend of the Ngoc Son Temple seen behind me here.

Walk. Walk. Walk to the temples and museums. There is so much to learn and experience in Hanoi! As long as you’ve got your trusty Google Maps, you’ll be alright. And, AGAIN, be wary of snatchers. Some of them pass by you on a bike and swipe whatever you’re holding. Pretty crafty, they can be!

That’s me taking a break in the temple of literature. Thank you Franco V (He’s on Instagram) for the photo!

And let’s not forget the food culture. As long as you don’t really think about the whole cleanliness issue, you’ll have a great time trying a whole slew of Vietnamese dishes! Hehe. But, really, I enjoyed food tripping in Hanoi. I enjoyed it oh so much, I even prepared a video about it! So, since I can’t seem to find my writing groove, Let me leave you with a video I edited from my salvaged Hanoi footage. Also, if you decide to visit Hanoi, this may be of help. Enjoy!

Hanoi, Vietnam, Travel Basics

Hanoi is the Capital of Vietnam found in the North (vs. Ho Chi Minh City or Saigon, the largest city in Vietnam, in South Vietnam). It is the second largest city in the country and  serves as a political center.

Vietnamese currency is the Dong with the smallest bill at 1,000! I was a millionaire in Vietnam… Which doesn’t say much, really. Exchange rates can be found here.

Language will be a barrier so it’s important to know a few basic phrases. Though they still won’t understand you unless you can pull off the accent as well.

(By the way, this post is more about the information and not much about the experience. The “cute” post with all the photos (at least those salvaged from my stolen phone) are  HERE. Hehe!)

How To Get There

Flying to Hanoi isn’t very convenient when coming from Manila. Most flights head to Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC – commonly known as Saigon) but Cebu Pacific recently started flying directly to and from Hanoi twice a week. Unfortunately, the flight schedules are less than ideal in a city with a 12 Midnight curfew.

From Singapore, I believe Jetstar has affordable flights. And coming from HCMC, I’m pretty sure you can find cheap domestic flights! 🙂

From the Noi Bai airport, a taxi is the only way to the main city so make sure your Hotel provides you with a serviced car/cab!

Where To Stay

Most travelers stay in the Old Quarters or French Quarters. This area maintained the original street layout of old Hanoi with streets being named after the goods sold along it. And so, we have Silk Street and Leather Street and Silver Street and so on. There are numerous hotels to stay in here and you will be surrounded by great shops, cafes, and eateries!

If you don’t expect the sun and moon of the hotels, then you’ll be alright in Hanoi. I stayed in Hanoi Deluxe Hotel which was quaint but clean and comfortable with a friendly staff.

Hanoi Deluxe Hotel. US$18-35/room/night http://hanoideluxehotel.com/

Hanoi Old Centre Hotel. US$25-$60/room/night http://www.hanoioldcentrehotel.com/

Hanoi Elite Hotel. US$40-$90 http://hanoielitehotel.com/

May De Ville Old Quarter Hotel. US$50-$100/room/night http://maydevilleoldquarterhotel.com/

And here’s a big, luxurious one!

Hotel Sofitel Metropole Hanoi.  http://www.sofitel.com/gb/hotel-1555-sofitel-legend-metropole-hanoi/index.shtml

How To Get Around

Walk. All you need is Google Maps and you’re good to go! If you like walking as I do, most everything is walkable.

Taxi. They’re metered so you know exactly how much to pay. But most cab drivers can barely speak English and they may not understand your pronunciation so best to show them where you’d like to go on a map (Google Maps, you rock.)

Motorbike. There are guys in street corners that offer you a ride on their motorbikes. They overcharge, though, so best to ask your hotel how much it should cost. These guys are NOT legit. Hehe.

Bike. If you’re brave enough, why not ask your hotel where it’s best to rent a bicycle for you to use? 😀 If I stayed longer, I may have tried this out for an afternoon. 😉

Pedicab. I didn’t ride a pedicab just ‘coz I didn’t see any local on one. Loads of foreigners take pedicab rides around the old quarters, though! I’m guessing these guys have tourist rates, though. So, again, ask your hotel how much they should cost you.

Where To Go

Sightseeing

Hoan Kiem Lake. Ngoc Son Temple. Turtle Tower. The Hoan Kiem Lake (Lake of the Restored Sword) is the largest lake in the city of lakes – Hanoi. It’s HUGE. In the north area of the lake is the Ngoc Son Temple (Temple of the Jade Mountain) which you can get to through the Huc Bridge (Morning Sunlight Bridge). The south area of the lake has the Turtle Tower. The legend that surrounds this lake is pretty interesting so read up!

National Museum of Vietnam. This is in the right side of Hoan Kiem Lake, separate from all the other sites below.

Temple of Literature. The most popular of all the Temple of Literatures (there are several), this temple served as the first university in Vietnam. Today, it is still one of the most important historical sites in Hanoi and even appears on the Vietnamese Dong – 100,000 bill.

Vietnam Military History Museum. Vietnam’s military history is very interesting as their wars against their (French, Japanese, American?) conquerors helped shaped the identity of the country. Naturally, there are 2 sides to every story. In the museum, you will see weapons, pictures of war, tanks and aircrafts, etc. The museum tells the story of a united Vietnam, never acknowledging South Vietnam’s government or their defiance of the socialist rule. Hmm. Pretty intriguing. Time to read up!

Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum. It is huge and the garden that surrounds the building is pretty,  but off-limits. I didn’t get to enter as it was closed (only open in the mornings) but in its central hall is the embalmed body of Chairman Ho Chi Minh. Every hour, the guards change. But, rest-assured, they all strictly enforce the rules – no shorts/skirts (don’t show your legs), no crossing of arms, no hands in pockets, no photography or video recording, no smoking, and no noise!

Ho Chi Minh Museum. This museum is dedicated to their late leader Ho Chi Minh and also tells the story of Vietnam’s struggle against foreign power. Once again, two side to every story. And… The winners often write (subjective) history. Which makes me question world history in general… Good thing I don’t know much about it. HAHAHA.

Shopping.

EVERYWHERE. I particularly enjoyed shopping at the boutique shops in Hang Non street!!! If you’re a lady looking to buy clothes and shoes… FIND THIS STREET. 😀 A whole bunch of local girls shop here so I’m pretty sure it’s the place to be!

Oh. And when shopping… Bargain!

Night Market. WATCH YOUR VALUABLES. This is where my bag got slashed and my phone got stolen. AYAYAY. ANYWAY. This happens Friday – Sunday night along Hang Ngang street and Dong Xuan street.

Outside the City

Halong Bay. One of UNESCO’s World Heritage sites, Halong Bay is definitely worth visiting if you have the time. Tours range from day trips to weekend stays either in hotels or junk boats. You can ask your hotel about it, search online, or even walk around the Old Quarter to find agencies that provide tours! http://www.halongbay-vietnam.com/


There are loads of other interesting places to see like Sapa and the Cuc Phong National Park. You can bike around, trek, or lounge, it’s really up to you! Check this site to find out more. http://www.hanoitraveltours.com/

What/Where To Eat

Hanoi is one amazing food trip. 🙂

Cha Ca La Vong (Resto/Dish). 14 Cha Ca Street. Beware of copycats right across the original! Cha Ca La Vong, the only thing on their menu, is grilled fish cooked right in front of you with turmeric and dill leaves, served with rice noodles and peanuts. Put as much chili as you’d like. SO GOOD. I want to eat this again but the dish isn’t found anywhere else!!!

Bun Bo Nam Bo (Resto/Dish). 7 Hàng Điếu, Cửa Đông. A bowl of beef noodles and veggies. This isn’t as soupy as Bun Thang or Pho. It’s pretty good. But I honestly didn’t enjoy it that much. I guess it just isn’t my taste. But still, it’s worth trying for yourself!

Little Hanoi (Resto). Ta Hien Street. These guys have other branches but this one is the original. Order their fresh rolls, oh so good!

Bun Thang (Dish). Cau Go Street. Bun Thang is a soup dish (add chicken!) served in various eateries. Just pick a place on Cau Go street. This dish is de-lish!

Quan An Ngon (Resto). 18 Phan Bội Châu, Cửa Nam. This restaurant is a must-see. They serve Vietnamese dishes galore under a huge tent in a courtyard of an old villa. Waiters are very helpful. And it’s always full of both foreigners and locals!

Pho. I don’t think I need to tell you any more about Pho. Hehe. :p

Also try The Highway on Bat Su Street which is where I tried eating crickets! They have a whole slew of delicious familiar and unfamiliar dishes there you can try. And Gecko is another safe bet with various branches around Hanoi (Old Quarters, mostly).

Okie dokes! That’s about it for the basics. To find out more about my experience, check out my Hanoi video on my YouTube Channel or read the next post!

The Hanoi-ing Impression Sandwich

The French occupied Hanoi in 1873 and became the capital of French Indochina after 1887.

My weeklong stay in Hanoi was, unfortunately, sandwiched by frustrating impressions, which I will release here in order to write a bitter-free blog post on Vietnam’s capital.

Upon leaving the arrival gates of the Noi Bai airport, I was greeted by a swarm of taxi drivers looking for unsuspecting passengers. Taxis in Hanoi have meters (those rate calculators) and these cabbies try and get you to agree on a fixed rate.

AYAYAY.

So should you go Hanoi-ing, don’t forget to ask your hotel to have someone pick you up. And keep the number of the hotel with you in case no one’s around to sweep you and your luggage off your feet or wheels or whatever… Lest you wind up like me – waiting for someone who never arrives.

Due to the odd time Cebu Pacific flights arrive in Hanoi (1am or so), there was a mix up with my “pick up”. So I waited over an hour for a cab that never came while overeager Vietnamese mosquitos feasted on my extremely sleepy boddeh!

Good thing a cab just so happened to pass by the dark and empty airport or else I may have spent the night there. (HEEYIPES.)

Oh, just so you know, there’s a curfew in Hanoi and almost everything shuts down at midnight so I cannot stress enough the importance of arranging someone to pick you up from the airport specially if you arrive late.

The Impression Sandwich title should give the correct impression that both the first AND last impressions will be written about. So let’s get the extremely irritating and intensely frustrating last impression out.

Saturday night, whilst trying to spend all my Dong (the Vietnamese currency) on pasalubong for friends & family…

(pasalubong is what we Filipinos call presents bought for others, usually when on a trip.  Para means “for” and salubong means “to greet” or “to meet” and these gifts are meant to be given when you “meet/greet” your loved ones again.)

My bag was slashed open from behind and some AWESOME person took my iPhone. I was extremely careful with the iPhone I named BUD WHITE throughout my stay and, admittedly, that night was the most careless I had been ’cause I was in a rush to finish my shopping and get back to my hotel before having to leave for the airport. I WAS STILL PRETTY CAREFUL THOUGH. I’d make sure the zipper of my bag was close to me and I’d hold my phone extremely tight most of the time. But the night market really is the perfect setting for thieves. You’ll eventually get stuck in a tight crowd. You’ll eventually look at items in stalls and not have all your attention on your bag.

*sigh*

You have no idea how pissed I was.

*sigh*

Farewell, Bud. And bye bye to all the photos and videos I took on the trip to provide a more entertaining and informative blog entry… So you guys should say bye bye to a more interesting Hanoi post from moi, too.

*sigh again*

ANYWHOOOO. Though my post on Hanoi will definitely be way LESS entertaining, I’ll still try to provide you with all the information you need to enjoy a trip to Hanoi as I did, for the most part.

Don’t worry, it’s still a very interesting place to visit. The buns that hold the sandwich may taste like crap, but what’s important is what’s in the sandwich itself rightttt? Right.

(Yep. That’s what I keep telling myself.)