Tag Archives: Metro

A Mirage in the Emirates

In the Emirates, the sun reaches far into any form of shade. Sunglasses are so much more than an accessory (Seriously, you CANNOT leave home without it.). The slightest hint of rain is a freak occurrence. Water is more expensive than petrol. Black figures floating about mustn’t be stared at. And something grand, humongous, luxurious, and/or opulent greets you in every corner.

I found myself in a whole new world, with a new (fantastic?) point of view. This would be my first long project for work and I ended up spending a month in Dubai, occasionally driving to Abu Dhabi.

What to do? What to see? There’s the tallest building in the world right next to the largest shopping mall and the biggest fountain show (in the middle of the desert). There’s the indoor ski slope and a few crazy, big water parks to choose from (in the middle of the desert). There’s a desert safari with dune bashing and a cultural show (naturally, in the middle of the desert). And a bunch of other things to see and do in this land of infinite sand! (Watch out for my posts on travel tips and places to see in Dubai.)

I found myself drawn to the Bastakiya Quarter, a restored historic district. It’s next to the Dubai Museum and the Dubai Creek and is the only place I found teeming with history and character. Get lost in the alleyways and walk into art galleries or pretty courtyards. Stroll along the notable Khor Dubai and listen for the chants from surrounding mosques. Take shelter from the heat at the Arabian Tea House Restaurant & Café. And if you’d like to try something new, just next door is the Local House Restaurant that serves camel burgers!

Hands down, my most awe-inspiring moment was visiting the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque. I’m not certain I’ve ever seen anything so massive and so beautiful. I could’ve stared at the structures in my burka for hours. I will admit, though, that I was more impressed with the exterior than the lavish rugs and golden fixtures inside.

 

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Here’s the thing about Dubai – it overflows with extravagance. Sports cars, palaces, gold and diamonds, designer brands… These are things that many aspire for. But from where I stand, there is no place for this level of excess in a world where over 1.4 billion people live in extreme poverty (living on less than $1.25 per day).

Another issue that bothered me was how many Filipinos work in Dubai. It was comforting for me, in a way. You walk around a mall and every store has a Pinoy employee. Hearing the Filipino language is not at all surprising. Plus, I sometimes get perks like better service or an extra refill of my drink just because I’m Pinay. But when I stop to think about it, I can’t help but be both sad and angry about the state of my country. A lot of Filipinos leave the Philippines not because they want to travel or experience what it’s like to live elsewhere. They leave because the so-called opportunities back home cannot provide them and their family a good life. They can do the same work abroad, and get better pay.

Overall, I’m glad I experienced Dubai for as long as I did. I got past the WOW factor. It gave meDesert time to see through the mirage… Not that it was all bad! They’ve built beautiful and functional cities, a strong economy, and thriving businesses. I must also give credit to how they’ve managed to somewhat break out of the strict Islamic religion; somewhat allowing alcohol, pork, and for people (women) to dress as they please. While they still remain shackled to religious tradition, at least they don’t strictly impose these traditions on those of varying beliefs…

But could this be yet another mirage? That’s certainly a possibility. I’ve heard a number of stories that lead me to believe so.

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My Top 5 Milk Tea Spots

Ang Mio Kio
You can check out a few other photos on my Instagram – MyJaninay

Milk Tea Madness around Metro Manila! Milk tea stands are sprouting up everywhere. It’s like the pearl shakes all over again; but now, these places have it all from pearl shakes to coffee-type stuff and, of course, ZE MILK TEA!

I understand it. Milk tea cravings haunt me. And I do enjoy the typical ones everyone tries like Cha Time, Happy Lemon, etc, etc.

But, for moi, my faves would have to be those in actual restaurants! Mm-mm-mm!!! So… I just want to share my favorite milk tea so far. You guys might want to try em out. Doesn’t hurt that in these restos, the food is good, too. You can enjoy lunch or dinner then cap it off with delish milk tea, as I do! WHEEEEE. I WANT.

In no particular order… Here goes!

5. Banana Leaf Asian Cafe’s Iced Milk Tea Hong Kong Style

SO GOOT. As for the food, my regulars are rotti canai with curry and the Hainanese Set Meal! That can feed 2 people already… Unless you feel like feasting which is perfectly fine in Banana Leaf because they have loads of tasty food. YEAY! There are a few branches all around the metro so it’s easy to find – Greenhills Promenade, Greenbelt, Rockwell, etc. Plus, they’re one of Philippine’s Best Restaurants in 2011!

http://www.bananaleaf.com.ph/

Thai Dara
For more photos, check out my Instagram – MyJaninay

4. Thai Dara’s Milk TeaI tried the quaint Thai Dara in Kapitolyo – you won’t miss it! They have another branch somewhere in QC as well. Their milk tea is gootenberg! And it’s great with spicy curry orders!

In case you didn’t know, milk relieves your tongue from the heat of spiciness. THAT is the cooling power of dairy!

3. Ang Mio Kio’s Milk Tea

Yummy Singaporean food in Ang Mio Kio – The Podium. And they have a range of delicious drinks like their milk tea and the milo dinosaur!

http://www.facebook.com/angmokiofood

2. Komrad’s Milk Tea

Komrad in Eastwood is a haven for people who enjoy spicy food. I LOVE IT THERE. Spiced up Chinese food for the win! But their hidden gem is definitely their milk tea. SO GOOD. I want to run over there right now and buy a glass!

1. Som’s Milk Tea

Som’s Milk Tea is sold in plastic bottles, like them typical PET bottles – very easy to hoard and stock in your refrigerator. And they’re REALLY good. I believe they have 2 locations – one is near Rockwell and the other is in the Maysilo circle across the Mandaluyong City Hall. I’d drive by there just to take a few bottles home.

ARGH. Now I’m craving for legit milk tea.

On Cynthia Alexander and Guerrilla Tears

A guerrilla tear trailed down my cheek reminding me that great music can be overwhelming, specially live.

From raindrops and goodbyes to welcoming the ecstatic pains of motherhood

From the beauty of the present to our forgotten respect for this world

From strolling past a sleeping lake to mind-tripping and cyclical bike rides

Cynthia Alexander has written powerful music, piercing through my metal-plated armor.

I’m still clutching at the emotions stirred by tonight’s conspiracy… Hence the blogpost (which I may just post tomorrow, a day late).

Thank goodness for music, my favorite time-travel machine, taking me back to electric experiences like tonight.

HUGE sigh.

MyJaninay finding herself in Cynthia Alexander’s June 16, 2012 gig at Conspiracy.

A special thank you to Pochoy for taking me. I hear and feel so much more with you.

Cynthia Alexander in Conspiracy, 16 June 2012
“This is more than intimate,” she said.
Conspiracy was packed, inside and out. Everyone enjoying Cynthia’s pleasant company and exquisite music.
“Amoy High School!”
Cynthia’s brother, Joey Ayala, came in through the window armed with funny quips.
“Dumaan Ako” performed by the talented siblings
My keyhole view of Cynthia Alexander… before I decided to stand up. 😉

“This is madness.”

One of the most wonderful people I know, Misha, suggested I watch this documentary by BBC. It’s about a bus driver from London who goes to Manila with a challenge to become a jeepney driver by the end of the trip – DRIVE A JEEP ALONE IN MANILA (Siya pa nanunukli)! He lives with Rogelio (a jeepney driver) and his family and learns, firsthand, how tough it is to live in our country.

I cried. And cried again. The world is anything but fair. I urge you, if you have a little less than an hour, to watch the docu below – The Toughest Place To Be A Bus Driver. You can watch it now or later. But I assure you, it is not a waste of time. My thoughts and frustrations are below.

I will write about 2 things. You may read one and not the other. Or not read at all. But I’m hoping you read both! :p

Road Rage

I, too, drive through the streets of Metro Manila. I confess that I do scream, curse, and lash-out (in the confines of my car) at pedestrians and other drivers on the road, most specially jeepney and bus drivers. In these moments, I feel I live in a place that is the epitome of inconsideration. And, against all my better judgment, I get sucked into the bandwagon.

Inconsideration, in my opinion, is an extremely huge problem in our society. I’ve always believed that if people were more considerate of each other, lines would move faster, traffic would ease up, mall-wide sales wouldn’t give me a migraine, and stress levels of most everyone when outside the confines of their home would decrease.

But where does this come from? Why can’t most people think of anyone but themselves?

I guess the true questions is, “How can one be considerate when one’s mind is on survival mode? Can I feed my family today?”

Inconsideration stems from this dog-eat-dog world, the reality of day-to-day survival.

What happens to my road rage now? It’s so much easier to be angry, curse at faceless strangers and not care. But how can you be angry knowing what these people come home to? … Knowing they’re stuck in a vicious cycle of suffering they can never get out of?

Rage turns to sorrow.

Life. To live. It is more than just physical survival.

To understand this rant, you’ll have to watch the documentary… Or just keep in mind that millions of Filipinos live in the slums, in their makeshift homes. Many are young married couples with 12-13 children.

How can one truly value life but accept the condition in which so many Filipinos are living?

How can one value life and accept that people eat recooked rotting food from the trash if they eat anything at all?

How can one that values life be OK with bringing a new life into this world only to starve, suffer, and have nothing but survival in mind?

How can one value truth but withhold readily available information, that is common knowledge to most educated people, from the less fortunate with less access?

How can one be against the RH Bill? I really CANNOT understand. What are you afraid of?

More abortion cases? Please explain to me how this happens with less cases of unwanted pregnancy.

Are you afraid that our country will have a problem of underpopulation like other developed countries? Oh my goodness. Do you really think that it’s as easy as the simplest cause-effect equation? There are so many factors that will contribute to that future possibility. Besides, if you have people that value having a family, this will not happen. I am aware of most all methods of contraception but I still want to have my own children one day… When I can actually sustain them financially and emotionally. Values formation and valuing the family as the basic unit of society can be taught and developed.

Please help me understand… Because my brain can’t seem to wrap itself around this.

What kind of person would think that a young married woman living in a makeshift box with 13 (THIRTEEN!) children and barely anything to eat is wrong for taking measures to prevent any more pregnancies?

Would you condemn her to hell? Isn’t she already living there?

A Letter From On High

The Philippine Flag
(From MyJaninay ‘s Instagram)
 

Dear Metro Manila,

I fly over you now amid the pitch black. Looking down, I see your city lights. I wish I could keep you that way – neat, pretty, and far away.

But descending into your chaos, I leave my naive wishes in the darkness to join in the wondrous complexities of your crude existence.

Bah. Humbug.

So much easier being a jaded adult rather than an idealistic and rational individual.

With wavering love,

MyJaninay